Nagios Doesn’t Suck (As much as people think)

My predecessor at my current company used a platform called check_mk to monitor our network.  Unfortunately, check_mk has a feature that populates based on network discovery and can be very chatty. check_mk is also very convoluted as it’s built on top of Icinga, which is built on top of Nagios.  When making changes, there were layers and layers of configuration files you had to dig through, at least, in the check_mk instance my predecessor had bequeathed me.  Needless to say, I was not a fan and it wasn’t very efficient.  I understand why they forked to create Icinga.  At the time, Nagios was stagnant.  Since then, I feel like the Nagios camp has progressed significantly.  I also understand why they forked Icinga to check_mk, but it’s not for me.   For the granularity I want in monitoring, check_mk would be more work intensive than Nagios. Continue reading

Devuan on a Dell XPS 15 (9560, 2017)

I’ve  been a Linux Systems Administrator for more than two decades, and I’m intimately aware of what’s necessary to run Linux in the enterprise. I knew after the viral epidemic that is systemd, that the Linux ecosystem was inherently broken, and we needed a change.  At that point, I sought out a group of folks identifying themselves as the VUA, or Veteran Unix Administrators.  This group is vehemently opposed to systemd and began a fork of Debian without systemd, now known as Devuan (pronounced dev one.) Devuan is still in it’s infancy, only one major release under it’s belt, but it’s a massively capable server platform. My company is now running solely on Devuan Linux for all of our LAMP stack applications.  We are even using it for virtualization using vserver.  On the desktop side of things, it’s coming along quite nicely as well, but there are definitely some growing pains.  My company recently purchased a Dell XPS 15 (9560, 2017) for me, and it came with Ubuntu.  I figured it was time to “put my money where my mouth is,” and try an install of Devuan on this very new hardware that uses an NVME disk and boots via UEFI.  This is a journal of that experience.   I’m doing most of this from memory, so there may be some minor typos and/or mistakes. Feel free to reach out if something doesn’t seem correct. Continue reading

Save Your Eyes: Go Dark on GitHub

I’ve always been a bit of a nocturnal person.  If I had my preference, I would go to bed every morning just shortly after the sun comes up.  I know this probably seems weird to many of you, but it’s always been something I’ve struggled with.  My circadian rhythm has always been that of a “night owl,” and unfortunately, the rest of the world runs on daylight. Continue reading

SouthEast LinuxFest Roundup #SELF2015

First and foremost, I must apologize as I’ve given no love to my blog in almost a year.  I’ve had many major personal and work events happen, and honestly, have just not had the motivation to write.  Nonetheless, I just got back from the SouthEast LinuxFest, #SELF2015, and it was phenomenal; it has definitely reinvigorated me. Continue reading

DevOpsDays ATL Rehash

I just returned from a short excursion to the ATL for DevOpsDays Atlanta, and I must say, I never get tired of being around the people in the DevOps community.  DevOpsDays are great opportunities for anyone looking to become part of the DevOps community or bring DevOps to their organization.  I was fortunate enough to be selected as a speaker at the conference, and spoke about something extremely important to me.  You can view my talk, Don’t Fear the DevOps, here:

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/76213070 w=640&h=360]

As far as the show itself, I can’t say enough good things about it.  Good people, solid food, and great times.  If every show I went to was as enjoyable as this specific outing, I may never come home.

Thank you to all of the sponsors that make these shows happen.  I feel that more collaboration and propagation of DevOps and Open Source happens at these style shows than any other event I attend.

Till next time…..

What is DevOps?

Everywhere we go, no matter what we do, we constantly here buzzwords; so much so that we’ve created the incredible pastime of BuzzWord Bingo. Unfortunately, this practice seems to be rampant in the tech industry. We’ve all been in those meetings with the new VP of Something That Never Actually Existed Before But Does Now So The CEO Can Give His Best Buddy a Job; that would be one hell of a business card, but I digress. Nonetheless, these meetings all start the same, “Hello, I’m Bob Brown-Noser, and I’m the new VP of Something Ridiculous and Completely Pointless, and I’m here to help you create the next-big-thing, to usher our product into a cutting-edge Web 2.0 platform, to create a synergy of sustainability and empowerment, to harness the technologies of cloud computing and big data, and to facilitate the convergence of disruptive technologies into a next-generation company.” Blah, blah, blah, blah, so on and so forth…………. Continue reading